Journey of an Architect is a blog started by Tim Ung to document his journey to design 30 projects by the age of 30 (May 2020). His posts focus on his design process, thoughts, struggles, and successes throughout his journey.

Newsletter 016

Newsletter 016

Every day, more architecture firms decide to integrate research into their practice and establish themselves as experts and leaders in a particular niche within the market. On the other hand, there are architecture firms who disagree with pursuing research in their practice. How can integrating research in help your firm? Learn about the 5 potential benefits of integrating research in architecture firms in this post.

Now, without further ado, here is this week’s Friday Four!

1. Lesson of the week – Find relationships between everything you pursue

One of the major topics being debated at my current firm is whether or not integrating research with the firm is economically worthwhile. As designers, we’re constantly searching for answers to difficult problems that arise in our projects. Many of these problems require us to spend lots of time and resources working with engineers or suppliers to develop a solution. Then, there are the research topics that are broader topics that require dedicated researchers. However, if we step back and look at the quality and in-depth analyses that come out of these projects, we’ll discover that there are so many relationships between research work and our marketing department, or building our staff by making them experts at a particular niche, or even strengthening our mission statements that say we pursue innovative solutions to our clients’ projects.

This also applies to anything else that you do in life. There’s a relationship between everything that we pursue. So take a moment and identify what those relationships are and continue to build and evolve them.

2. Best moment of the week – Discovering the AIA University courses

After receiving my Architect license in NY, I’ve been attending very few continuing education courses and I saw that I needed a significant amount of Health, Safety, and Welfare (HSW) courses this year. So I logged onto my AIA account and came across the AIA University where you can find lots of courses from this year’s conferences as well as special courses that were made for the website. I’ve purchased two and found several free ones that offered the HSW credit. These videos are very helpful and I’m surprised that I was able to learn so much from the videos that I’ve watched!

3. What I’m currently reading – Art’s Principles by Arthur Gensler

Ever since I was in architecture school, I’ve always admired the architecture firm Gensler because of the range of projects that they’ve worked on as well as their ever growing size. Arthur Gensler’s book, Art's Principals, has been on my Amazon wish list for some time now and I finally decided to purchase it along with many others. Gensler’s book is full of very helpful advice, some of which many people are already doing, but others that make you question whether or not you’re doing it all wrong. I highly recommend this book to anyone thinking about starting their own practice.

4. 30x30 Project Update – In depth code review of 5x30 – Restaurant and Apartments

Now that my friend’s project is moving full steam ahead, I took a few hours to conduct a thorough code review of his building. I want to make sure that both he and I know what we’re in for with his building renovations. During my review, I discovered that in New York, all residential occupancies that use the International Building Code of 2015 (IBC) will need to be sprinklered. This is a new code to follow for buildings in NY because we adopted the 2015 IBC so many of my peers in the office were also surprised by this discovery!

Newsletter 017

Newsletter 017

Newsletter 015

Newsletter 015